Can challenge-based learning be effective online? A case study using experiential learning theory

Authors

  • Ruggero Colombari Department of Management and Production Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24, 10129 Turin; Entrepreneurship and Innovation Centre (EIC), Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24, 10129 Turin
  • Elettra D'Amico Department of Management and Production Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24, 10129 Turin; Entrepreneurship and Innovation Centre (EIC), Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24, 10129 Turin
  • Emilio Paolucci Department of Management and Production Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24, 10129 Turin; Entrepreneurship and Innovation Centre (EIC), Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24, 10129 Turin

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.23726/cij.2021.1287

Keywords:

challenge-based learning, online learning, experiential learning theory, self-determined learning

Abstract

The COVID-19 outbreak had a major effect on moving online learning activities, also traditionally experiential ones such as those designed upon Challenge-Based Learning (CBL) principles. This article explores the impacts produced on a Challenge-Based Innovation project work carried out in the context of a program developed by Politecnico di Milano and Politecnico di Torino. A survey of 92 students and interviews were carried out to assess the impact on learning outcomes and processes, and four main success factors were identified: informal interaction, time for exploration, asynchronous lecturing, relevant challenges. Suggestions for an effective design of online CBI-like programs are offered.

 

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Published

2021-06-30

How to Cite

Colombari, R. ., D’Amico, E., & Paolucci, E. . (2021). Can challenge-based learning be effective online? A case study using experiential learning theory. CERN IdeaSquare Journal of Experimental Innovation, 5(1), 40-48. https://doi.org/10.23726/cij.2021.1287